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  • Sarah Crosby

Updated: Nov 6, 2019


Are you off work, but not sure you are disabled by Social Security's definitions? We understand. The rules are complicated, but we are here to help you understand and navigate Social Security.


1.) Your disability must be expected to last for at least 12 months or be expected to end in death. If you break your arm and can no longer do your job for six weeks while you heal, Social Security is not the program for you. You might be covered by short term disability through your employer - check with your human resources department.

2.) If you have a disabling condition, but are still earning more than $1,220 ($1,260 in 2020) per month on average, you won't be f Want to add a caption to this image? Click the Settings icon. ound disabled. To qualify for Social Security, your condition must prevent you from performing substantial gainful activity (a fancy government way of saying you can't earn more than $1,220 per month). Social Security helps individuals replace lost income, so if you're still working and making more than $1,220 per month, you likely won't qualify. However, there are some nuances to this - so it is best to consult a lawyer who may spot issues like an unsuccessful work attempt. (We'll discuss that more later).


3.) Your age matters. If you're under age 50, Social Security will consider if you can do ANY kind of work you might be able to do - even if that work is easier than what you have done before. For example, if you're 47 years old and have been doing factory work on your feet all day all your life, Social Security will find you are not disabled if there is still work you might be able to do while seated. These rules change after age 50, depending on your work history.


If you have questions about your disability, please contact Sarah Crosby for a free case evaluation at 317-760-9293.


  • Sarah Crosby

Updated: Nov 6, 2019


Applying for disability can be daunting, but it does not need to be. Before making an application for benefits, gather the following information to help make the process easier:


1.) List of doctors you have seen recently for your disabling condition, including their name, phone number, and address.

2.) List of medications you are taking.

3.) List of jobs you have had in the last 15 years (for disability purposes, only the last 15 years are relevant, even if you have worked longer).

4.) Your spouse's Social Security information (your spouse's earnings may impact your benefits if you apply for Supplemental Security Income).


Having all of this information organized can help you with the application and give you peace of mind that nothing was missed.

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The information provided on this site is not legal advice. You should consult an attorney for individual advice

©2019 Sarah M. Crosby

IndyDisability.com